Assessment

Climber:
Matt Kelly

Viewing measurement system:

2020-11-03

filled in 52% (83 of 160)

Created: 2020-11-03 05:51
Modified: 2020-11-03 05:58

Basic data

Weight
175 lbs
Subjective age
24 years old
Average sleep duration
9 hours
Daily activity
Low active
Training-oriented nutrition
No, why?
Climbing experience (excluding breaks)
1.5 years
Climbing-specific training
2 days/week
Volume of climbing-specific training
4 hours/week
Climbing outdoors
60 days/year
Development predisposition
Can't say
Training with coach
None
Mental training/methods
None
Overall workout
0 days/week
Volume of overall workout
0 hours/week
Massage or foam rolling
None
Stretching
1 hours/week
Average of 3 hardest leads ONSIGHTPrimary set
OS lead level
5.11c YDS USA Average routes length: 80 ft Environment: Rocks Climbing angle: Vertical
Average routes length
80 ft
Environment
Rocks
Climbing angle
Vertical
Average of 3 hardest leads REDPOINTPrimary set
RP lead level
5.12b YDS USA Average routes length: 70 ft Environment: Rocks Climbing angle: Vertical
Average routes length
70 ft
Environment
Rocks
Climbing angle
Vertical

Strength / Power / Endurance

No data entered

Mobility / Flexibility

No data entered

Balance / Coordination

No data entered

Mental

When I make a mistake in my movements while climbing, it doesn't distract me, I make do and push on.
Sometimes
I know how to manage my focus while climbing.
Always
I can get my attention back to the "here and now" and focus on the task if something distracts me.
Often
I can cut myself off from everyday problems and unpleasant situations that have happened before to focus on climbing with a clear head.
Always
On competition day or before pulling onto rock I focus only on my task, on movement, and on what helps me to be focused and confident.
Sometimes
I know what can distract me while climbing (noise, sun, wind, other climbers, comments, slippery foothold or hold) and I can control it.
Often
After falling off I can refocus for another attempt.
Often
My mind races before I pull on and during climbing or I talk to myself too much.
Rarely
I pay attention to my emotions before, during, and after climbing.
Often
When I rest in the middle of a climb, I feel what happens in my muscles and I can determine the moment I should continue climbing.
Rarely
I can control anger / sadness / frustration after a failed attempt / falling off.
Often
When I feel anxiety before climbing at competitions or the crag, I can control it and reduce it with my techniques, e.g. calm breathing, remembering effective trials, successes, etc.
Always
I become unnecessarily tense/angry/uptight before difficult movements because of nervousness.
Never
Before pulling onto a difficult route or a boulder I can put myself into optimal arousal for climbing.
Sometimes
I know what affects my level of nervousness before and during climbing (f.ex. the uncertainty of movement, own or environmental pressure, grade of the route, rank of the competition, etc.).
Often
Climbing over the clip or tricky clipping causes me a sudden increase of nerves (tremor, anxiety) and a loss of flow in my climbing.
Rarely
I'm aware of what I say to myself inside my head before, during, and after climbing.
Often
My mind races when I approach a difficult spot or a crux.
Rarely
I can stay positive even after an unsuccessful start in a competition or a bad day at the crag and make constructive conclusions.
Sometimes
I'm aware of my thoughts about any long standing projects before I approach them, I manage these thoughts and how they affect my attitude.
Sometimes
I have a plan for what I say to myself while climbing.
Often
When I say positive things to myself I feel calmer.
Always
I can successfully motivate myself by encouraging myself inside my head or to myself.
Always
I use my favorite "key/anchor" words f. ex. I can do it, hold it, you are strong, breathe now!
Often
When I'm climbing, I expect that I will give my best and send a route or a boulder.
Often
I enjoy taking part in competitions or climbing outside even if I fail or send the route inefficiently.
Always
Difficult places on the route or environmental adversities are a problem for me and I have difficulties finding solutions.
Rarely
Skills development is crucial or important in my climbing and I have an overall plan for my development.
Sometimes
While climbing a project or in competitions I only think about not falling off, not losing to a rival, not being last place.
Often
I often choose routes that are difficult for me, but possible to send (does not apply to warm-up or cool down at the end of the day or injury situations).
Always
I can motivate myself to train hard even if I don't see immediate progress.
Often
Failures in climbing are acceptable to me.
Often
I trust my training plan and I believe that the goals I’ve chosen are appropriate.
Rarely
I know what my goals for the day are when I go into training or show up at the crag.
Sometimes
I know what is important and valuable to me in climbing.
Often
Before the start of the climbing season I set a main climbing goal.
Often
I know what steps led me to achieve my climbing goal.
Rarely
I have a training plan for each season.
Rarely
I regularly check my training plan and progress with regard to increasing my climbing skills and physical capabilities.
Often
After the end of the season I take stock of how I performed on my climbing goals.
Often
I get nervous and I can't control it before climbing a new route, even below my limit.
Never
I go out of my comfort zone and fight to the end, despite high probability of falling off.
Often
I decide to make difficult moves even when I'm high above the quickdraw or high on a boulder.
Often
I pay attention to the opinions of others and negative comments if I do poorly on the route or in competition.
Often
I have symptoms such as: palpitations, sweaty hands, shortness of breath, dry mouth or tightness/cramps in the stomach before a competition or important/difficult move.
Rarely
When the planned sequence doesn’t work or it becomes difficult I tell my belayer to take.
Sometimes
While climbing I focus on the moves, rather than thinking of what can happen if I fall.
Often
During climbing I focus on whether the equipment works fine, instead of climbing.
Rarely
I am terrified by the fact that I may lose control over my climbing (slipping out from a foot hold, wrong sequence, extreme nervousness, etc.).
Rarely
My self-confidence is stable regardless of bad results at competitions or failure on rock.
Always
I'm nervous about climbing onsight / my project / a competition route due to uncertainty of the result and possible shame.
Rarely
I try new routes and boulders that require skills I don't have in order to learn something, even if it ends with falling off and me looking bad to other climbers.
Often
I believe in my climbing capabilities and that I will achieve everything I plan.
Often
I make difficult and surprising moves that I've never done before at the limit of my abilities.
Often
When climbing I am sure of my physical, technical, and mental preparation.
Often
When climbing RedPoint, I am sure that I will give 100% to accomplish each of the trained sequences.
Often
After an unsuccessful attempt I make or look for excuses for external reasons only.
Rarely
I use visualization before each climbing attempt.
Sometimes
I can imagine doing my climbing task using kinesthetic sense (f.eg. load on fingers, type of friction, shoulder tension, legs tension, body position, etc.).
Rarely
I recall my best ascents and competitions and feel positive about my success.
Always
I have difficulty forming a vivid, dynamic, colorful, and multi-sensory image of myself climbing (sense of sight, hearing, etc.).
Never
When I choose a climbing goal I train regularly by imagining the send before my trip to the crag.
Sometimes
I use visualization to bring about the right emotional state, relax my body, and focus before competition or important real rock projects during climbing.
Sometimes
I watch better climbers than myself during live competitions or in movies to improve my climbing technique.
Often
I can imagine the entire sequence of moves or sequences in the most important places, including foot holds and holds, in their actual order.
Rarely